The Best DP 2400 earpiece

Today we are looking at the Motorola Dp2400 earpiece, the new radio is slowly becoming the normal radio used at events and festivals. This article is looking at the earpiece range for the new radio, with a different type of connector compared to the DP3400 or GP340, it is worth doing a bit more research before you purchase these radio accessories.

For your hard-earned wonga, you get a 12-month failure warranty (always a welcome and appreciated feature), as well as an excellent little device, all things considered.

The DP2400 earpiece features extra-long Kevlar strengthened cabling (although its unlikely that the cable will stop a bullet, we’re just telling you that now), as well as a rotating sprung metal clip, which is a genuine improvement on the more stationary design (although you probably can’t break out that Sumo suit just yet) and an excellent inline microphone.

HM15The sound quality is very, very good and the earpiece itself is generally strong and durable. With this earpiece, you’ll be able to hear any instruction clearly and cleanly.

The DP2400 earpiece also features a multipin plug, but the plug is only designed to fit the Motorola DP2400 and DP2600 series. It will not work with the DP3400 or DP4800 series, which severely limits its appeal in this area, as it renders the DP2400 earpiece less versatile than the other, cheaper models on this list.

Overall, this is a very nice earpiece indeed. Performance wise, however, there’s not a lot to choose from between any of the earpieces featured on this list, all of them are quality products and none will let you down.

The DP2400 earpiece is a solid, dependable product that does a good job and doesn’t hurt your bank account. What more can you ask for?

…And so our series ends. However, we hope that you’ve found this series informative and helpful to you. With all the emphasis we place on two-way radios (across the various outposts of our little multimedia empire), it seemed overdue that we focussed a little bit on the peripherals. Glad you could join us.

Doctor Who Anniversary Special Breaks Record

The 50th Anniversary episode of popular British TV show ‘Doctor Who’, which aired on Saturday 23rd November, has broken the world record for largest ever simulcast of a television drama.

A simulcast is a simultaneous broadcast that is viewed via more than one medium.

In the UK alone, some 10.2 million people tuned in to the BBC show, although others still would have digitally recorded the special in order to view it at a time better suited to them. Continue reading

Why isn’t there a Dick Tracy style radio wristwatch on the market? (Asked by Nadia from Los Angeles, California)

(Asked by Nadia from Los Angeles, California)

Before I answer your question, I have a question for you; what’s the weather like in the City of Angels?

Because right now, as I type this from my home in the UK, its bloody freezing and if it’s warmer where you are, then I think I may have to answer your question in person!

Just kidding.

On to your question, does it matter if the watch isn’t ‘Dick Tracy’ branded? Because if that’s what you’re after, then I’m sorry to say that, to the best of my knowledge at least, a ‘Dick Tracy’ branded two-way radio wristwatch doesn’t exist. If/when they make another DT movie (the last time they did, I was a little boy and I had the promotional T-shirt, so we must be due for one), then it seems likely that they will make one. Continue reading

Why Can’t I Use a Radio or a Phone on an Aeroplane?

The real reason is that the signals generated by your radio receiver (yes, it generates signals as well as receives them) can interfere with the aeroplane’s navigation equipment.

In an article for ‘The Straight Dope’, published in 1987, Cecil Adams (who ran a similar, but far superior, column to this one) explained it far better than I could. He said,

“Most modern receivers use something called a “local oscillator,” which is sort of an internal transmitter. The oscillator generates signal A, which is mixed with the somewhat raw incoming signal B to produce nice, easy-to-work-with signal C. There’s usually some sort of shielding around the oscillator, but it’s not always effective and sometimes errant signals leak out to make life difficult for other radio equipment nearby. If the other equipment happens to be an aircraft navigation device, somebody could wind up digging furrows with a $25 million plow. So do your bit for air safety and bring a tape player instead.”

Of course, you can replace ‘tape player’ with ‘iPod’ and not lose anything in the discussion…Feasibly, you could replace ‘iPod’ with ‘smartphone’ and lose even less.

However, the oscillator isn’t always going to cause a major problem, in fact, 9 times out of 10 you’ll be fine, but is it really worth endangering the lives of every passenger aboard the plane just so you can catch up on the football results?

Any answer other than ‘no’ would be inhumanly monstrous. Unless, of course, its a penalty shootout…

Actually, I’m over-exaggerating somewhat, in fact, not even your mobile would be likely to cause that much damage. In theory it could, but the reality for phones being banned is a little bit less terrifying, as www.Wired.com’s Cliff Kuang explains:

“Sure, your mobile can interfere with avionics — in theory. But in practice, it’s far from likely. Cockpits and communications systems have been protected against electromagnetic meddling through safeguards like shielded wiring and support structures since the 1960s. So why the resistance? Part of it, naturally, comes from the call carriers. When phones ping for signals at 35,000 feet, they can hit hundreds of towers at once, necessitating complicated parsing of roaming agreements. Providers don’t want the hassle if they’re not being properly compensated, so the government has left the plane ban in place”.

So, essentially, it’s not worth the risk to use a radio receiver on a plane and you can’t make calls because it would be a bugger to regulate, as well as a logistical nightmare to deal with, for the phone companies. That’s about it, really.

What Should One Consider When Buying a Walkie Talkie For Business Use?

Buying a two way radio system is a large investment for any business, big or small and, as a result, it is vital that the customer makes the right choice.

Claire Davies, of eZine Articles.com says,

“Purchasing two-way radios for commercial or personal use can prove to be a wise investment for anyone wanting a reliable cost-effective communication system. BUT, the decision as to which radio is right for you requires careful consideration”.

She also makes it clear that,

“Operating environments vary greatly from one consumer to the next and there is no such thing as a ‘one size fits all’ approach when choosing ‘the best’ radio. While they can be pricey, two-way radios are a very useful and cost-effective piece of kit to have in your communication armory”.

She’s right; there are lots of things to consider before making the ultimate choice, chief amongst them is the band you’ll be using. UHF (Ultra High Frequency) radios operate on frequencies between 400 and 512 Megahertz. These radios have a very strong signal and are especially useful if users will be moving between and indoor and an outdoor setting.

Conversely, there are the VHF (Very High Frequency) radios. VHF is generally weaker than UHF, but can carry a signal over a longer distance and generally uses less power. It is important to be aware that VHF and UHF radios are completely incompatible, so choosing one may exclude your from getting the other.

Another thing to note is that there is actually a difference between a two-way radio and a walkie talkie, although the terms are, more often than not, used interchangeably. According to 2wayradionline.co.uk,

Modern walkie talkies still utilize the push-to-talk technology and are available in numerous price ranges – from units sold as toys to more commercial units used for public safety, business or any setting where a portable radio would be necessary. Some walkie talkie models can be made to be very small and depending on the differing use, the equipment varies with consumer use and commercial use”.  

However….

“While commercial 2 way radios or hand-held portable two-way radios are often called walkie-talkies or ‘handie-talkies’, don’t confuse them with the cheaper model 2 way radio ‘walkie-talkies’. Two-way radios are available in mobile and stationary base configurations. An example of a two way radio that both transmits and receives at the same time (or full-duplex) is a mobile phone or cellular telephone, which uses two different radio frequencies to carry the two directions of the conversation simultaneously”.

Whilst this may seem a trifle nitpicky, it is important to keep in mind that buying a walkie talkie or two-way radio set represents a significant corporate investment. It is also important to consider whether you want the ‘licensed’ or ‘license free’ radio band. Basically, licensed radios are secure, but a lot more expensive, whereas license free radios can be eavesdropped upon. Whatever you buy, these factors are the most important to consider.

For more information on how 2wayradionline.co.uk can help your business communicate better, visit their site here